zodiacbaby:

*talking to myself as I wobble up the stairs* , you are sober and in control of the situation

hedendom:

Thor crosses the Bifrost as a lightning bolt perfectly follows the path of a rainbow.
Photograph by Birk Möbius

hedendom:

Thor crosses the Bifrost as a lightning bolt perfectly follows the path of a rainbow.

Photograph by Birk Möbius

syaffolee:

Book of Kells (800)

syaffolee:

Book of Kells (800)

Fall is here!!

Fall is here!!

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Harold Speed (1872-1957)  -  Study for figure of Boreas, chalk on paper.

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Harold Speed (1872-1957)  -  Study for figure of Boreas, chalk on paper.

breathtakingdestinations:

Copenhagen - Denmark (von igrigorik)

breathtakingdestinations:

Copenhagen - Denmark (von igrigorik)

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book
This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.
Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book

This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.

Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

[People interacting with individuals with borderline personality disorder] know the person’s emotion but they don’t know why [it appeared] and they really don’t have the fundamental understanding that the person is actually doing the best they can [to regulate their emotion].

Dr. Marsha Linehan (in this video), University of Washington (via welcometomentalward)

woodendreams:

(by Molly Wassenaar)

woodendreams:

(by Molly Wassenaar)